Posts

Showing posts from July, 2017

The Pacifists Who Sent Their Sons to War

Image
Like half of what is on this blog, the following is based on an original insight made by Brant Gardner. See Traditions of the Fathers: The Book of Mormon as History

The people of Anti-Nephi-Lehi are an enigma. At first, they were Lamanites and sworn enemies of the Nephites and as Lamanites would have been engaged in the raiding, capturing, enslavement and slaughter of Nephites.

However, the sons of a Nephite king, newly endowed with evangelical zeal, end up converting entire Lamanite cities to the Nephite faith, such that the converted Lamanites make a covenant to adopt their religion and become extreme pacifists, burying their weapons and preferring to be slaughtered by the sword than to defend themselves violently.

After these newly converted Lamanites uproot and are taken in as refugees, by their former enemies, they offer up their adolescent sons to fight in a Nephite war, rather than breaking their pacifistic covenant(Alma 24Alma 53), which theoretically disqualifies them as …

The Mexican Christ

Image
The following is based on a small part, of a larger argument, made by Mark Alan Wright. You can read the full presentation at: Axes Mundi: Ritual Complexes in Mesoamerica and the Book of Mormon.

The visitation of Jesus Christ to ancient America is a great example of God condenseding to his children and speaking to them in the weakness of their own language and understanding(D&C 1:24).

Reading this account through a mesoamerican lens, we can also appreciate the nature of Christ's atonement for our sins, from a different angle. The Gospel of Luke and 3 Nephi both give converging witness of the physical resurrection but with some small variation. When appearing to his disciples, the Savior says:

Arise and come forth unto me, that ye may thrust your hands into my side, and also that ye may feel the prints of the nails in my hands and in my feet, that ye may know that I am the God of Israel, and the God of the whole earth, and have been slain for the sins of the world. -3 Nephi 11:1…

Comparing Cuicuilco and Jacobugath

Image
Like half of what is on this blog, the following is based on an original insight made by Brant Gardner, particularly on Teotihuacan. See Traditions of the Fathers: The Book of Mormon as History

Mormon was a writer who was juggling three competing agendas: moralist, historian and poet. Grant Hardy has shown that as a historian, Mormon used methods which, through modern eyes, could be seen as unreliable, namely that for Mormon the reliability of a historical account was tied to the character of the record keeper:

And now it came to pass that according to our record, and we know our record to be true, for behold, it was a just man who did keep the record. - 3 Nephi 8:1

By modern standards, this is an irrational standard to hold for we know that bad people can keep accurate records of the past and good people can keep inaccurate records of the past; character is irrelevant when judging the methods of a historian. Mormon was also aware of the imperfect nature of his work:
And whoso receive…